(Source: pandreaa)

(Source: rubyredwisp)

ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *) ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:


jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context
for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.


Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)denominalisation: when you verb a noun.eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acornlethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *)

ohnofixit:

the-real-seebs:

jumpingjacktrash:

ceruleancynic:

mackenzie-destroyer-of-worlds:

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

I DIDNT REALIZE I NEEDED THIS IN MY LIFE

that’s not what lacuna means

also an ‘eggcorn’ is a misspelling based on a guess at etymology or meaning, not a typo, and nothing about whether it makes sense in context

for instance: ‘eyebulb’ for eyeball

And “sesquipedalian” is the word for a word with multiple syllables. Although it can be used to refer to someone prone to using those words, but it does not inherently imply that they overuse such words, or that they do so “to appear smart”. The definition given for “lethologica” sounds more like “aphasia” to me. And “mot juste” nearly always has to be “le mot juste”.

Following up on the above:

lacuna: a gap or missing part; in linguistics: an accidental gap, where a word does not exist but would be grammatically permitted. These can be phonological (nonsense words like “blorp”), morphological (derive=>derivation; arrive=>”arrivation”), or semantic (i.e. gender-specific words for cousin or gender neutral words for uncle and aunt).

contrastive focus reduplication: repeating a word specifically to contrast against something else (i.e., it’s an e-book, not a book book.)

denominalisation: when you verb a noun.

eggcorn: is an eggcorn for the word acorn

lethologica: when you can’t remember the word you’re looking for (forgetting this word gets very recursive.)  BUT, can also refer to a psychological condition and is kind of a weird word in general. (“Lethologica has the required meaning but, from what I can tell, is found strictly in books that have words like “lethologica” in them.” *)

fromthe1975:

// X //

(Source: notpetewentz)

dajo42:

two dads have a conversation

"haha yes i’m going golfing on the weekend"
"hello going golfing on the weekend, i’m dad"
"hello dad, i’m dad"
"hello dad, i’m dad"
"hel̡lo ̀dad, ̢i͟’͜m̧ d́ąd"
"h̕͠͞e̶͘͟l̸̀ló ҉d̕͟ad͝,̷͞ ̢̛i͏̢’m̛͠ ̕ḑ̢͝a͏͢͝ḑ͠"
"H̶͟͏͜E̢͞L҉͏̸҉Ļ̵͘͞O̵͟͟͟ ͏̷̨͠Ḑ̀A̢̛̕͞͞D̸҉̢̕,̛͠ ͏̴Į̵̷̛͘’̀͟͏̵̕M̧͜͢͠ ͢͢͏́͢D̵À͞͝D͞"

not-a-taylor:

SUuuuuuuper done with your shit

Matt’s final readthrough

(Source: invokeur)